Virtual Insanity

 

I read a recent article on slate.com, regarding how one woman plans to never post anything about her child online ever. EVER. If you’ve followed his blog recently, you know about my struggle to even post Yoda’s picture for fear of public reaction, due to Ethan. 

But never posting anything about Yoda…ever? Hmm…that seems to be a bit harsh. It also seems ridiculously unrealistic.

I should probably explain my stance before I delve further into the topic. I’m naturally a very private person, so to those who know me, keeping this pregnancy a secret for as long as I have isn’t a far stretch. Never once did I share an ultrasound photo of Ethan, even when one could clearly make out his facial features. I really value my privacy and I’m lucky to have friends and family who honor that as well. I figured if someone really wants to know what’s going in my life, they could send me a message or call me. I don’t necessarily have to broadcast everything nor do I want to. I’m sure you know people like that as well. How many people can you think of off the top of your head, have suddenly announced births, marriages, divorces, etc. and you had no idea? In the day and age where everyone feels obligated to share everything, it’s nice to have a ‘oh’ surprise.

Back to the topic at hand, I think it’s up to the parents to post about their children and they can use their discretion as to what and how much they post. I have friends who post every.single.thing about their kids, almost to the point of annoyance. (Really, babe…I don’t care that Junior had cornflakes for breakfast.) Some post key/significant details like birthdays, grade school achievements, and the like, which I feel is awesome. You have an amazing, talented, and bright kid, brag about them!

Let’s keep it real for a moment – Do you need an album full of 50 photos of their first few days? Do you need to post a photo of them every.single.day? I think after a few photos, I kinda have an idea on what your kid looks like.

But to say for 18 years, your child will be completely off the grid? What if your child suddenly goes missing? The first time anyone will see a photo is when it’s broadcasted on the news, along with thousands of other strangers who will see it. What are you going to do when your child becomes a teenager and wants to utilize social media? Most websites allow children to use them when they’re 13, though I know a lot of parents who bend that rule.

I think as parents, there has to be a fine line between posting about your child and being ridiculous. While I’m still on the bubble of posting a fresh picture of Yoda online when he’s born, I doubt I’ll wait until he’s 18. M. and I have come to a temporary agreement of one photo a month. It might seem extreme but let’s face it, after the birth/newborn photos, how many photos does one need to see of the same baby on a regular basis? I think if we released a monthly photo, showing his progress, it’ll give everyone a nice surprise. It doesn’t mean there won’t be any Thanksgiving photos or Santa Claus photos for those who wish to see them. I just don’t feel we need to broadcast every waking moment of his life.

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